U.S.-Russian Security Relations

Fraught U.S.-Russian security dynamics have spurred reevaluations of the entire relationship between the two former Cold War adversaries. The Center for International and Security Studies at Maryland (CISSM)’s U.S.-Russia Security Relations project focuses on establishing a constructive agenda for the two countries that includes security issues where the risks for confrontation are high but where cooperation to reduce shared dangers is possible. 

Full project description
May 1, 2017 | Catherine Kelleher

What conditions are needed for a stable transition to a new nuclear order, one in which the total number of nuclear weapons would be reduced to very low numbers, perhaps even zero? We have addressed the myriad issues raised by...

Jul 19, 2017 | Anya Loukianova

Why is the global public so apathetic about nuclear disarmament? To answer this question, this article examines the various arguments made in support of policies meant to rid the world of atomic weapons. They include the immorality of deterrence, its...

Jun 19, 2017 | Nickolas Roth

During the latter part of the Cold War, many strategists thought of nuclear deterrence and arms control as two of the most essential stabilizing elements of the same strategy in managing an adversarial relationship. The renewed crisis between the West...

Sep 15, 2016 | Nilsu Goren

Beyond its history of military coups and incomplete civilian oversight of its armed forces, Turkey has struggled with defining an independent international security policy. Its perception of U.S./NATO security guarantees has historically shaped its decision to either prioritize collective defense...

Nov 23, 2017 | Guest author

It is easy to get disheartened working in the security field, particularly in light of the current state of U.S.-Russian relations. We are up against grave challenges rooted in long-term grievances with no immediate policy resolution in sight. Will our...

Nov 21, 2017 | Naoko Aoki

Experts are divided over whether Russia can play a constructive role in de-escalating tensions over the North Korean nuclear problem. As someone who looks at North Korea, I think Moscow can and should play a role in reducing tensions.  Here...

Oct 18, 2017 | Clay Ramsay

President Trump’s refusal to re-certify that the Iran nuclear deal negotiated by the United States, Russia, and other world powers still serves U.S. security interests leaves Russian policymakers with a confounding set of new questions. 

Sep 25, 2017 | Sergey Rogov

Relations between Washington and Moscow are at their lowest point in many decades and have entered what I would call the Cold War 2.0. Objectively, there is no reason for a new Cold War: There is no ideological confrontation between...